Your Profile

Pinterest life begins and ends with your profile.

You simply can’t succeed on Pinterest if your profile isn’t up to snuff. A great profile clearly defines your purpose and what people can expect from your pins.

If people aren’t attracted to your profile then why should they bother following you?

Before we go into the details of what makes a great Pinterest profile, it’s important to ensure that your account is a business account. This sounds a little bit scary, especially if you’ve had a Pinterest account for a while now, but converting your personal account to a business one simply gives you access to new tools.

If you don’t have a Pinterest account yet, then you’ll want to sign up as a business so you don’t have to worry about converting later.

It doesn’t matter if you’re a single mom or an accountant, you want your profile to be a business account so you can get the most out of Pinterest.

One or Multiple Accounts?

A lot of you reading this already have a Pinterest account and you’ve been thinking about how to get the most out of Pinterest for your blog.

One of the questions then becomes do you utilize your personal account as your blog account as well or do you create a separate blog profile?

There is no definitive answer to this. The best that I can offer are some tips to help push you one way or another.

If you’re account has a decent amount of followers (in the thousands), then you’ll probably want to consider keeping the personal account and transitioning it over to make it your blog profile. If you’re audience likes what you are pinning they will stick around and there is always a ton of crossover when it comes to what people like.

If there is a chance down the road you will end up selling your blog or expanding it to a multiple-person operation then you might want to set up a separate account since your Pinterest profile will serve as a major asset.

Could you imagine buying a blog where over 50% of the traffic comes from Pinterest, but you will no longer have access to the Pinterest account?

That doesn’t make much sense.

If you think that some of your boards just don’t fit your blog’s audience at all, but you like to pin stuff for bookmarking reasons then you can create secret boards for your personal interests.

That way you can still pin and build up your profile for your blog.

The most important thing to remember is that your Pinterest profile is now meant for your audience and not you. If that is hard to swallow then maybe you should consider setting up a separate Pinterest profile.

Pinterest Guide for Bloggers

Profile Name

When you set up a business account, this will be referred to as your business name. What most people do is simply put their personal or blog’s name here. While you should definitely do that, you also want to add 1 or 2 keywords to it as well.

How do you know what keywords to use? Think about the two big words that stand out for your niche. In Obstacle.co’s case, the two keywords that stood out to me were entrepreneur and blogging. I could’ve went with blogger instead, but those are the two main ones that jumped out.

So Obstacle.co’s Pinterest name is Obstacle.co | Entrepreneur, Blogging, & Voltron.

What does Voltron have to do with any of this? Nothing when it comes to entrepreneurship or blogging, but it adds a bit of a personal touch to things. When trying to apply your brand all over the place it can be very easy to get caught up in being professional. Your brand is professional but it is also human.

Profile Description

This one is key for Pinterest SEO.

You want a description that has a number of your keywords in it, but is also human readable. That means don’t just put 13 keywords in your description without trying to form a sentence.

First and foremost you are writing the description for humans. You also want the fancy SEO robots to pay attention as well.

Word of advice here is to describe exactly what you do and who you do it for. It’s always important to clearly define your audience so that people know right away if your profile is for them.

Here is Obstacle.co’s description:

Helping bloggers and entrepreneurs turn their blogs into profitable businesses. Take the free 7-day Blog Rocket email course: bit.ly/2bT0mVv

So again I’m using the keywords entrepreneur and blogger here and I’ve also added blog. You’ll also notice that I added in an actionable step telling people to take the free 7-day Blog Rocket email course.

This helps in sending people to your mailing list, but is really only effective if you have an attractive offer and a landing page setup for it. If you don’t have both of these ready then hold off on the actionable step in the description.

When thinking about a description don’t push so hard to be unique and wacky. There are no need for hashtags. Save those for Twitter and Instagram. You have 160 characters to work your magic. Make it count.

Profile Avatar

Your profile avatar (image) is one of the first things that people will see when they go on Pinterest. Don’t settle for a plain image. Be considerate of what your avatar is because it plays a role in drawing the eye towards your profile.

Taking a look at the Pinterest feed you can see that it is drowning in a sea on monotonous profile images. What can you do to make yours standout?

The most popular type avatar is the headshot. These work well because it makes people feel a connection with the person behind the Pinterest account. If you are going to use a headshot for your avatar make sure your face isn’t perfectly centered. You also want to have some colors to help draw the eye. Bonus points if you aren’t looking at the camera.

If your profile is more about your blog and it’s brand then you’ll want to have your logo as your avatar. This can make your profile seem like just another brand, but that is why it is important to add other elements to your profile to make it seem more human.

In Obstacle.co’s case that is why I have Voltron in the profile name.

Site URL

What’s the point of using Pinterest to send people to your blog if you don’t try your best to make that happen? When you have a Pinterest business account you get the opportunity to post your site’s URL on your profile.

The About

Your profile name, description, and avatar can be considered the about section of your profile. While it plays a big roll in getting people to follow you, the real meat and potatoes of your profile lies within the boards and pins.

Let’s take a look at those things next.